New to Factoring?

For those who aren't familiar with factoring, it is basically a fast way to get cash to run your business.

Factoring is Not a Loan

When you send your customers an invoice, they usually have 30 days to pay you back. Factoring companies will give you the bulk of the cash up front, sometimes within 24 hours, and collect the payments from your customers themselves. Once the invoices are paid in full, you’ll get the balance left over, minus a small fee.


Factoring Doesn't Require Debt

Sounds simple enough – fast cash for your business – no loans, no debt.

So how do you go about choosing the best factoring company?

Not all of them are created equal. Not all of them will give you the same level of service you need to help grow your business.

Everyone claims they have the simplest rate structure in the industry, no long-term contracts, same day funding, no up-front fees, no monthly minimums or maximums, etc., etc., etc.

We also offer these same benefits, but we GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU that other factoring companies don’t.

Here’s Why We Are The Factoring Company You Need For Your Business

No other factoring company matches our level of superior service and offerings.


As you can see, we simply have more to offer you.

Other factoring companies don’t even compare.
Boise

And Not All Factoring Companies Can Say This:

More than half of our new business comes through client referrals.

So, Can Your Company Use Factoring?

Of Course! Companies of all sizes, from small privately-owned companies to large multi-national corporations, use factoring as a way to increase their cash flow. Factoring spans all industries, including trucking, transportation, manufacturing and distribution, textiles, oil and gas, staffing agencies and more.

Companies use the cash generated from factoring to pay for inventory, buy new equipment, add employees, expand operations—basically any expenses related to their business. Factoring allows a company to make quicker decisions and expand at a faster pace.

Unlike a bank loan, factoring has…

  • No principle or interest to pay over time
  • No debt to repay
  • Unlimited funding potential – no caps
  • Fast funding – no waiting months like at a bank
  • Approval is based on the strength of your clients, not your credit
  • Startups are welcome in using funding services

Some of the benefits you receive with factoring are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information for the city of Boise

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Boise is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Idaho, as well as the county seat of Ada County. Located on the Boise River in southwestern Idaho, the population of Boise at the 2010 Census was 205,671, the 99th largest in the nation. Its estimated population in 2013 was 214,237.The Boise City Nampa metropolitan area includes five counties with a combined population of 616,500, the most populous metropolitan area in Idaho. It contains the state's three largest cities; Boise, Nampa, and Meridian. Boise is the fourth most populous metropolitan area in the United States' Pacific Northwest region, behind Seattle, Portland and Spokane.Time magazine listed Boise as #1 of eight other cities in a 2014 issue under the header ""Solutions for America"" as ""Getting it right."" Other major industries are headquartered in Boise or have large manufacturing facilities present.

 

The state government is also one of the city's largest employers.The area's largest private, locally based, publicly traded employer is Technology. Others include . The call center industry is also a major source of employment; there are over 20 call centers in the city employing more than 7,000 people, including Global ( a company), E, was formed in Boise, though headquartered at Pasco, Washington. The original airmail contract was from Pasco to Elko, Nevada with stops in Boise in both directions. The company is the root of present day United Airlines, which still serves the city at the newly renovated and upgraded Boise Airport.Inc.com rated Boise #9 on their list of hottest mid size cities for entrepreneurs in 2007

 

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Information for the state of Idaho

Gross state product for 2004 was $43.6�billion. The per capita income for 2004 was $26,881. Idaho is an important agricultural state, producing nearly one-third of the potatoes grown in the United States. All three varieties of wheat, Dark Northern Spring, Hard Red, and Soft White are grown in the state. Nez Perce County is considered a premier Soft White growing locale. Important industries in Idaho are food processing, lumber and wood products, machinery, chemical products, paper products, electronics manufacturing, silver and other mining, and tourism. The world's largest factory for barrel cheese, the raw product for processed cheese is located in Gooding, Idaho. It has a capacity of 120,000 metric tons per year of barrel cheese and belongs to the Glanbia group. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a government lab for nuclear energy research, is also an important part of the eastern Idaho economy. Idaho also is home to three facilities of Anheuser-Busch which provide a large part of the malt for breweries located across the nation.

 

Today, the largest industry in Idaho is the science and technology sector. It accounts for over 25% of the state's total revenue and over 70% of the state's exports. Idaho's industrial economy is growing, with high-tech products leading the way. Since the late 1970s, Boise has emerged as a center for semiconductor manufacturing. Boise is the home of Micron Technology, the only U.S. manufacturer of dynamic random access memory (DRAM) chips. Micron at one time manufactured desktop computers, but with very limited success. Hewlett-Packard has operated a large plant in Boise since the 1970s, which is devoted primarily to LaserJet printers production.

 

ON Semiconductor, whose worldwide headquarters in Pocatello, is a widely recognized innovator in modern integrated mixed-signal semiconductor products, mixed-signal foundry services, and structured digital products. Coldwater Creek, a women's clothing retailer, is headquartered in Sandpoint. Sun Microsystems (now a part of Oracle Corporation) has two offices in Boise and a parts depot in Pocatello. Sun brings $4 million in annual salaries and over $300 million of revenue to the state each year.

 

You have things to do and sometimes it just does not make sense to put them off until you get paid  

There are many reasons why factoring has become a popular and valuable financial tool for businesses today. The key benefit of factoring is that a business receives a quick boost to its cash flow: in fact, many factoring companies offer cash on their Accounts Receivable within 24 hours! -Factoring Companies Id

 

 

GIVE US 10 MINUTES AND YOU'LL..  

Factoring Companies Id Articles

The Difference between Accounts Receivable Financing and Factoring

 

Today, it’s not as easy for businesses to access finance as it was in past years, and more companies are being forced to look for alternative, non banking financing options in order to access the capital they require to help their business grow.

 

Two of the more popular tools available to cash strapped business owners are Accounts Receivable Financing (A/R Financing) and factoring. Some business owners believe these two are the same, but there are, in fact, some small yet significant differences.

 

What Is Factoring?

 

Factoring is when a commercial finance company, also known as a factor or factoring company, purchases a business’s outstanding accounts receivable. At that time, the factor will typically advance the business somewhere between 70% and 90% of the invoice’s value. Then, once the invoice is collected from the customer, the remaining balance – minus a factoring fee – is released to the business. The factoring fee could range from between 1.5% and 5.5%. It’s calculated on the total face value of the invoice and depends on how many days the funds are in use and other aspects, like the collection risk.

 

When a business has a factoring contract they can usually choose which invoices they want to sell to the factor: it’s not generally an all or nothing process. Once the factor has purchased an invoice they become responsible for managing the receivable until the account has been paid. Essentially, the factor becomes the business’s accounts receivable department and credit manager, analyzing credit reports, performing credit checks, mailing invoices, and documenting payments.

 

What Is Accounts Receivable Financing?

 

Accounts Receivable Financing is more similar to a traditional bank loan, however there are some key differences. Bank loans are secured with collateral; which might be real estate, the business owner’s personal assets, or plant and equipment; whereas Accounts Receivable Financing is backed by the business’s assets related to the Accounts Receivable. When a business has an Accounts Receivable financing agreement, a borrowing base is established at each draw against which the business is able to borrow money: this would typically be between 70% and 90% of the qualified receivables.

 

Between 1% and 2% is typically charged as a collateral management fee against the outstanding amount, and interest is only calculated as and when the money is advanced. An invoice must be less than 90 days old in order to count towards the borrowing base, and the finance company must deem the business credit worthy. There may also be other conditions to fulfil.

 

So, you can see that there are many similarities between Accounts Receivable financing and factoring; however, one is the sale of an asset (receivables or invoices) to a third party, while the other is actually a loan. In many ways, though, they do act similarly. Below we’ve listed the main features of each so you can determine which would be the best fit for your company.

 

Accounts Receivable Financing

 

• Generally, Accounts Receivable Financing is not as expensive as factoring;
• It can be easier to move from this type of financing to a traditional bank line of credit once a business becomes bankable again;
• Typically, a minimum of $75,000 per month is required in sales to qualify, so this type of financing may not be available to small companies;
• Due to the fact that the business will be required to submit all of its Accounts Receivable to the finance company, this type of financing can be less flexible than factoring.

 

Factoring

 

• It’s quite easy to qualify for factoring, and factoring is the ideal solution for start ups and financially challenged companies;
• Because businesses can decide which invoices they want to sell to the factor, factoring offers more flexibility than Accounts Receivable Financing;
• The company is able to track total costs on an invoice by invoice basis because factoring has a simple and straightforward fee structure.

 

In Conclusion

 

Today we see both Accounts Receivable Financing and factoring as traditional sources of financing; effective when traditional bank financing is not an option. Factoring can carry a business through a period when an immediate cash input is required.

 

Somewhere between 12 and 24 months most companies are generally able to repair their financial situation and once again become bankable. However, some companies in certain industries continue factoring their invoices indefinitely.An example of this is the trucking industry, which relies heavily on factoring for cash flow injections.

 

 

 

You have things to do and sometimes it just does not make sense to put them off until you get paid

 

 

Factoring Companies Id Articles

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About Invoice Factoring

 

Perhaps you’ve heard about Invoice Factoring but you’re not sure how it works or how it might help your business. The purpose of this post is to provide a clear explanation of what Invoice Factoring is and how it works.Basically, Invoice Factoring is a viable alternative to traditional financing methods, providing your company with fast access to working capital. There’s no large debt to repay and there are no strings attached. It probably sounds too good to be true, but we can assure you it’s not! Invoice Factoring has become a lifesaver to many businesses, so let’s go into this a little further to see how Invoice Factoring might help your business go from just so-so to really great!

 

How Invoice Factoring Works

 

A very brief definition of invoice factoring is that it converts your open invoices into immediate cash, which of course sounds perfect if you’re experiencing a cash flow problem. Factoring saves you from having to wait the 60 or 90 days (sometimes even more) for payment by your customers. With invoice factoring you have the flexibility to factor whichever invoices you want and however many invoices you need, to ensure you have enough cash on hand to grow your business.

 

The following is a short description of how the process works –

 

Once you and your chosen factoring company have reached an agreement and set up your account, you’re now free to begin submitting copies of your unpaid invoices to the factoring company. These invoices must be for products that have been delivered or for work that’s been completed. With invoice factoring you simply continue invoicing your customers as usual, then fax or email a copy of the invoice directly to your factoring company.

 

Now here’s the good part! You’ll receive a cash advance within 24 hours! Once the factor has verified your invoices, a deposit of as much as 95% of the value of the invoices will be deposited directly into your bank account.

 

You continue working as per usual, and the factoring company works to collect on your accounts. It’s now your factor’s responsibility to engage in the active collection of these accounts, thus allowing you more time to focus on the big stuff, like providing your customers with excellent service and continuing to grow your business.

 

As a customer of the factoring company you can repeat this process with as many different clients as you want and as many times as you want. You may choose to factor all of your clients, or just the clients that are known for being slow-paying clients. The choice is yours!

 

The Benefits of Invoice Factoring

 

Once you’re working with an invoice factoring company you’ll have control over your cash flow, and more importantly, you’ll have a working relationship with your factor that will help your business grow in lots more ways. Let’s take a closer look at some of the ways a factoring company can help you grow your business –Credit Checks and Background Verification

 

It’s important to all businesses that they work with honest, reliable customers; customers who have a solid payment history. Sales must be turned into revenue as quickly as possible. However, we know that credit checks and background verifications can be very expensive and these costs very quickly eat away at your working capital. Now, it will be your invoice factoring company who provides these checks for you, at no additional charge. This means that any issues will be addressed before they affect your business, thus ensuring that you’re working with top-quality customers.

 

Credit Repair and Credit Building

 

Even if your business credit is less than perfect, you can still apply for a competitive invoice factoring program. The benefit of this to the business owner is that, not only will factoring your open invoices cover your daily operating costs, it will also help pay down any current debt in order to rebuild your credit rating. The good news is that start-ups also qualify for invoice factoring so, if you’re just getting your business off the ground, factoring is the ideal financing alternative to help you hit the ground running.

 

Other Money Saving Opportunities

 

Invoice factoring can certainly save your company money, and it’s not only with competitive rates. By negotiating with your suppliers for early-pay discounts or other payment incentives, you’ll soon discover new ways of putting your rejuvenated cash flow to good use. And don’t forget that, depending on how much you factor, you could well qualify for a volume discount, and this will further reduce your rates.

 

Steady and Consistent Cash Flow

 

When you begin factoring your invoices you’ll be able to regain complete control of your working capital. Whether you’re simply tired of waiting up to 90 days for money that’s owed to you, or perhaps your business is subject to seasonal fluctuations, either way, invoice factoring is the ideal method for regulating your cash flow.

 

Now You Can Start Dreaming Big!

 

You may have become used to business being steady, but with invoice factoring you’ll have the opportunity for business growth in many new ways .

 

o You’ll be able to attract larger clients, with better contracts;
o Increased business marketing efforts;
o New technology investments, or upgrades;
o The ability to employ more staff;
o Training and further education programs for existing staff;
o Relocation of your business, or site expansion.

 

Finally, No More Debt!

 

One of the most attractive things about invoice factoring is that it’s not like a traditional loan: it won’t add additional debt to your balance sheet. In fact, it’s actually the opposite; because Invoice Factoring provides you with the extra cash you need to be able to settle old debts. With factoring, it’s already your money so there’s no money to pay back and no interest to pay. All factoring does is help you get your money into your bank account - quicker!

 

Why Haven’t I Heard of Invoice Factoring Before?

 

This is a question a lot of business owners ask. Invoice factoring certainly isn’t new, but maybe it’s just been overshadowed in the past by bank loans and other types of business investments. The fact is that factoring goes right back to the days of the Roman Empire, where factors assisted businessmen (usually farmers) in growing their business. Then, later, it was used in the textile and clothing industry to help pay for raw materials, to finance transactions, and accept larger purchase orders. Today, invoice factoring is used by many different types of industries, such as:

 

• Construction
• Transportation
• Medical
• Staffing, HR
• Consulting
• Engineering
• Marketing/Media

 

Becoming Familiar with Factoring Terminology

 

Don’t be discouraged because you don’t understand factoring terminology. See below for an explanation of general factoring terms :

 

Account Debtor:
An account debt or is your customer.

 

Accounts Receivable Ageing Report:
This is the name given to a report which shows the financial figure of unpaid receivables, in addition to how long they’ve remained unpaid.

 

Accounts Receivable Factoring; also known as Invoice Factoring:
These two terms can be used interchangeably because they mean exactly the same thing.

 

Discount Rate:
This refers to the percentage of the invoice charged by the factor as a fee for advancing funds.

 

Due Diligence:
This refers to the background research carried out by the factor to determine potential customers.

 

Factoring Advance Rate:
This rate is a percentage of the invoice that’s advanced within 24 hours to the client – this figure is generally between 80 and 95% of the total amount of the invoice.

 

Factoring Broker:
A factoring broker is a third party whose position is to connect business owners with appropriate factoring companies in order to meet the business’s goals and needs.

 

Lien:
The right to retain possession of property until a debt has been discharged.

 

Non-Recourse Funding:
Most businesses have experienced customers who fail to pay their invoices within the agreed payment terms, or worse, the invoice is never paid at all! Non-Recourse Funding is when the factor assumes all responsibility for unpaid invoices. Because the factoring company is accepting the risk, Non-Recourse Funding is more expensive than Recourse Funding.

 

Recourse Funding:
With Recourse Funding, your company must buy back the receivables if your client fails to pay within the agreed payment terms.

 

Reserve:
This is the amount of the Accounts Receivable retained by the factor until such time as full payment has been made by the customer.

 

Spot Factoring:
This refers to a one-off agreement that offers staffing companies the ability to factor just one single invoice.

 

Your Customers, and Factoring

 

It’s important that we point out here that factoring is not a negative thing, and your factoring company is definitely not a collections agency. In fact, it’s important to your factoring company that they maintain good relationships with both you and your customers, and it’s their aim to provide the best customer service possible. It’s in your factoring company’s best interests that the factoring process works as smoothly as possible.

 

The following will give you a general idea of how factoring works :

 

• Once you’ve made the decision to start invoice factoring, your dedicated account manager will start by verifying that your debtors are indeed customers, in addition to advising them of your new remittance address. It’s important to remember that it makes no difference to your clients where they send their payment: they know their invoice must be paid, so this is simply a change of address for payments.

 

• Your factoring account manager will be very experienced and will assure your clients that they’ll be well taken care of, and that the factoring company will be managing your invoices in future by taking over your accounts receivable. And that’s all there is to it! Nothing will change between your company and your customers: you’ll still invoice them as usual, and they’ll simply forward their payment to a new Post Office box. Your account manager will be available to help if any problems should arise.

 

What You Should Look For in a Factoring Company

 

Once you start doing your own research you’ll discover that there are many factoring companies out there, but they’re definitely not all equal. The following are points to consider when comparing factoring companies:

 

Fees
As we’ve explained, factoring is a little more expensive than a traditional bank loan, but some small businesses don’t qualify for a bank loan, so being able to achieve some working capital is better than none at all. Do your research, and make sure you understand the overall cost of factoring, in addition to the extra smaller fees that may be charged by your factor. These extra fees may include account set-up fees, application fees, credit reports, costs to research any liens, charges for last-minute funding, or for money transfers. Not all factors charge these extra fees, and not all factors have hidden fees, which means that it’s very important that you choose a factor you’re comfortable with and one that you can trust.

 

Flexibility
This is a very important aspect of factoring, and one we can’t stress enough. Make sure you very carefully read the fine print of your factoring contract! If you start working with a factoring company and then realize that you’re locked into terms that don’t suit your own particular circumstances, you’re going to be extremely unhappy. These unsatisfactory terms might include how much you’re able to factor each month, or being tied to a specific factoring company for the life of your business. If you sign up for a long-term contract, then change your mind, it’s going to be a very expensive exercise trying to get out of the contract. Don’t let this happen to you! Be very clear on how much you can factor each month, which clients are eligible for factoring, and how long you’re signing up for.

 

Communication
At one point or another we’ve all had to deal with a business with poor communication skills, and we probably all agree that it’s extremely frustrating. So, imagine a business with poor communication skills that’s also handling your money! Naturally, when it comes to your business and your money, you need someone that’s going to immediately respond to your inquiries. All factoring companies are going to say their customer service is second-to-none, but be very cautious here. Pay close attention to when and how your potential factoring company responds to your calls and emails, because this is how they’ll be responding to your customers. If you’re not 100% happy then move on to another factoring company, because there are certainly plenty to choose from!

 

Industry Expertise
Remember that there are many factoring companies out there servicing many industries, so you should be looking for one that services your own industry. Ideally, you’ll choose a factoring company that specializes in your niche, which means that they’ll already understand a lot about your business. The bonus of using a factoring company with industry expertise is that they may also offer programs specific to your industry, such as fuel cards and back-office support. It’s these extras that may prove very beneficial when making your final decision on a factoring company.

 

 

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Factoring Companies Id Articles

Why Do Companies Choose Factoring?

 

We know that factoring is the ideal way for a business to access instant cash on their company’s receivables, but there are other important benefits as well. Factoring can be a very handy financial instrument for many businesses.

 

Listed below Are Six Key Benefits of Factoring

 

No. 1: Back Office Solutions

 

Anyone running a business knows just how time consuming and expensiveit can be collecting payments from customers. When you employ a factoring company they’ll take over that role for you using their own collection specialists: it’s their job to follow up with customers until such time as your account has been paid in full. In addition, some factoring companies use online accounts, which means that you’ll have the ability to track your customers’ payments in real time.

 

Handing this time consuming part of your business over to the factoring company frees up your time to do what you do best – running your business, looking for new business opportunities, and providing your customers with excellent customer service.

 

No. 2: Better Quality Customers

 

Some factoring companies have their own rating systems for companies involved in your industry, in addition to having access to credit data on companies that could well become your new customers, and days pay information. Others create their own rating systems for companies working in your industry, which allows you to make calculated, informed decisions about both existing and new customers.

 

No. 3: Instant Access to Cash

 

When a company provides goods or services on credit it usually has to wait somewhere between 30 and 90 days for customers to pay on their invoice, and this very often leads to cash flow problems for the business. And that’s the beauty of factoring! When you use a factoring company you’ll typically receive an advance on an invoice within 24 hours. This immediate injection of cash allows businesses to purchase additional equipment, employ new staff, and cover other business expenses.

 

No. 4: Growing Your Business

 

Because factoring provides instant access to cash, it offers you the flexibility to grow your business at a faster pace. In addition, factoring is very simple to set up. A factoring account can be created within a matter of days, whereas a traditional bank loan can take weeks. And, there’s no limit to the amount of funding a factoring company can provide, unlike bank loans. Of course, this is assuming the factoring company you choose to work with has a strong capital structure. Over a period of time, the volume of factoring can increase within months – from thousands to millions of dollars.

 

No. 5: Funding for Start Ups

 

Start Ups quite often require financing to get their business up and running; but because they have no cash flow statements or balance sheets, and no business history, they’re highly unlikely to qualify for cash flow or asset based lending.

 

Factoring is not concerned about these requirements because it’s main interest is in the credit history of your customers. Before a factoring company offers you financial assistance it will examine your customers’ credit scores, their payment patterns, and general financial health. Typically, the factoring company will not be interested in how long your company has been operating.

 

No. 6: Factoring Is Not a Debt

 

Factoring does not become a debt to your business because it’s not a loan. Your business receives financial support from the factoring company as and when you accumulate invoices, and the matter is settled once your customers have paid in full. It’s true that if you’re utilizing recourse factoring, you, as the factoring client, assume the risk if your customers default on payment; however, factoring companies usually allow businesses to work off that amount by retaining a portion of reserve payments or future cash payments.

 

 

 

You Can Find More Information at  http://sellingaccountsreceivable.com/
and at Receivables Factoring at truckermoney.com

Call Us Today at: 1-888-239-9162

 

Watch our Factoring Company Video below to see how we work for you.

 

 


 

Get CASH NOW for your outstanding invoices.

 

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